Jack Schatzberg...photographs and talks about horses


Questions and Answers

Q.

Jack,

I am most curious about the correct standing poses for Quarter Horses, Arabians and TB as they are most popular in our area. I do know that Quarter Horses should be photographed so as to emphasize their muscularity (the photographer opposite the shoulder?). Am I correct that Arabians should hold the proper stretched stance so as to emphsize a flatter topline? I think it may be Thoroughbred's which give me the most problems. It seems that they more often have poor leg structure. Am I wrong with these ideas?

Thanks for your answer,

Christine


A.

Christine,

WHEN SHOOTING HORSES, THE PHOTOGRAPHER MUST BE ABLE TO SEE ALL FOUR FEET, AND THE EARS MUST BE UP AND ALERT.

THOROUGHBREDS are photographed from the side only. The horse should not be stretched, but should stand squarely. The inside hind leg should be placed to the rear of the outside hind leg. This helps to show the animal's hip to better advantage. The inside foreleg should be placed ahead of the outside foreleg. This helps to show the slope of the shoulder. The horse's head should be held in a high, natural position turned slightly toward the photographer, showing the face markings.

THE AMERICAN QUARTER HORSE is shown in three different positions. From the side: The Quarter Horse is shown like the Thoroughbred, except that the legs are placed slightly underneath the horse and the head is held in a lower position. From the front: The horse should stand with his feet absolutely square and evenly spaced. (Like a four poster bed) The photographer should be offset, but the horse should be looking straight on. From the rear: The photographer should be offset with the horse's legs absolutely square and evenly spaced. The horse's head should be turned in the direction of the photographer.

THE ARABIAN is shown from the side. Follow the directions of the Thoroughbred, but the rear legs are stretched to help show a straight croup and top line. The head is held high, showing off the long arched neck.

THE MORGAN HORSE is usually photographed from the side. The front legs are vertical, and spaced evenly apart. The horse is stretched slightly, with the hind legs also spaced evenly apart, to show a level croup and top line. The head is held proudly, in a moderately high position.

Remember, the position of the camera relative to the height of the animal will control the horse's apparent size. Holding the camera below the heart of the horse will make the animal appear taller, and conversely having the camera above the level of its heart will make the horse appear shorter. Use this to good advantage in your shooting.


Subject heading: Photographing the different breeds
Posted: Sep 1998
     
Return to previous page



 © Copyright 1997, 1998, Jack Schatzberg Inc.
   All rights reserved